Made on a 3D printer

Crazy things I’ve made on a 3D printer

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Millennium Falcon

I started playing around with 3D printing last year, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result: I'm now completely addicted to it.
These are some of the prints I made using a variety of printers from Monoprice, Flashforge and Anycubic. Many of the files can be found at Thingiverse.
This Millennium Falcon was so big I had to print it in two parts and glue it together.

Millennium Falcon

3D printing, like virtual reality, is one of those technology things that always seems to be on the cusp of going mainstream — without ever quite crossing over. Even though we’ve seen the concept play out for years on TV and in movies (what do you think a Star Trek replicator is doing?), having a 3D printer at home is still considered wildly exotic outside a small enthusiast audience.

Last year, I started playing around with 3D printing, less commonly known as additive manufacturing, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result. I’m now completely addicted to 3D printing. Over the past several months, I’ve searched for the best 3D printer technology and tested several 3D printing models, from rock-bottom Monoprice printers to step-up resin printers that produce a truly professional-level print for prototyping.

Below are printers in the lower-cost price range. We tested these 3D printers in the CNET Labs and compare the close-ups of one of our test prints, a bust of Abraham Lincoln. All 3D prints require a little smoothing and filing with a hobby file to look their best (you can also prime and paint each print, fill gaps with filler compound and so on) — but the Abes presented below are right off the print bed, no touch-ups after the printing.

One printer I have not tested yet, but hear a lot of good feedback about, is the Creality Ender 3, which currently costs an affordable $230 and has a large community of dedicated fans who claim it’s the best 3D printer. Just note that some more assembly is required than with these other printers.

For what to print and how to start printing, including materials (e.g., polylactic acid vs. ABS plastic), printing technology and software, see my latest tips and advice for 3D printing. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page.

Fallout phone stand

It includes a little channel to snake your Lightning cable through.

Fallout phone stand

3D printing, like virtual reality, is one of those technology things that always seems to be on the cusp of going mainstream — without ever quite crossing over. Even though we’ve seen the concept play out for years on TV and in movies (what do you think a Star Trek replicator is doing?), having a 3D printer at home is still considered wildly exotic outside a small enthusiast audience.

Last year, I started playing around with 3D printing, less commonly known as additive manufacturing, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result. I’m now completely addicted to 3D printing. Over the past several months, I’ve searched for the best 3D printer technology and tested several 3D printing models, from rock-bottom Monoprice printers to step-up resin printers that produce a truly professional-level print for prototyping.

Below are printers in the lower-cost price range. We tested these 3D printers in the CNET Labs and compare the close-ups of one of our test prints, a bust of Abraham Lincoln. All 3D prints require a little smoothing and filing with a hobby file to look their best (you can also prime and paint each print, fill gaps with filler compound and so on) — but the Abes presented below are right off the print bed, no touch-ups after the printing.

One printer I have not tested yet, but hear a lot of good feedback about, is the Creality Ender 3, which currently costs an affordable $230 and has a large community of dedicated fans who claim it’s the best 3D printer. Just note that some more assembly is required than with these other printers.

For what to print and how to start printing, including materials (e.g., polylactic acid vs. ABS plastic), printing technology and software, see my latest tips and advice for 3D printing. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page.

Han Solo in carbonite

Pretty much the first thing everyone prints.

Han Solo in carbonite

3D printing, like virtual reality, is one of those technology things that always seems to be on the cusp of going mainstream — without ever quite crossing over. Even though we’ve seen the concept play out for years on TV and in movies (what do you think a Star Trek replicator is doing?), having a 3D printer at home is still considered wildly exotic outside a small enthusiast audience.

Last year, I started playing around with 3D printing, less commonly known as additive manufacturing, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result. I’m now completely addicted to 3D printing. Over the past several months, I’ve searched for the best 3D printer technology and tested several 3D printing models, from rock-bottom Monoprice printers to step-up resin printers that produce a truly professional-level print for prototyping.

Below are printers in the lower-cost price range. We tested these 3D printers in the CNET Labs and compare the close-ups of one of our test prints, a bust of Abraham Lincoln. All 3D prints require a little smoothing and filing with a hobby file to look their best (you can also prime and paint each print, fill gaps with filler compound and so on) — but the Abes presented below are right off the print bed, no touch-ups after the printing.

One printer I have not tested yet, but hear a lot of good feedback about, is the Creality Ender 3, which currently costs an affordable $230 and has a large community of dedicated fans who claim it’s the best 3D printer. Just note that some more assembly is required than with these other printers.

For what to print and how to start printing, including materials (e.g., polylactic acid vs. ABS plastic), printing technology and software, see my latest tips and advice for 3D printing. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page.

Dice tower

You haven't gone all-in until you've designed and printed your own custom dice tower. 

Dice tower

3D printing, like virtual reality, is one of those technology things that always seems to be on the cusp of going mainstream — without ever quite crossing over. Even though we’ve seen the concept play out for years on TV and in movies (what do you think a Star Trek replicator is doing?), having a 3D printer at home is still considered wildly exotic outside a small enthusiast audience.

Last year, I started playing around with 3D printing, less commonly known as additive manufacturing, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result. I’m now completely addicted to 3D printing. Over the past several months, I’ve searched for the best 3D printer technology and tested several 3D printing models, from rock-bottom Monoprice printers to step-up resin printers that produce a truly professional-level print for prototyping.

Below are printers in the lower-cost price range. We tested these 3D printers in the CNET Labs and compare the close-ups of one of our test prints, a bust of Abraham Lincoln. All 3D prints require a little smoothing and filing with a hobby file to look their best (you can also prime and paint each print, fill gaps with filler compound and so on) — but the Abes presented below are right off the print bed, no touch-ups after the printing.

One printer I have not tested yet, but hear a lot of good feedback about, is the Creality Ender 3, which currently costs an affordable $230 and has a large community of dedicated fans who claim it’s the best 3D printer. Just note that some more assembly is required than with these other printers.

For what to print and how to start printing, including materials (e.g., polylactic acid vs. ABS plastic), printing technology and software, see my latest tips and advice for 3D printing. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page.

Deck holder

Another card game accessory, for holding a draw deck and a discard pile in one hand. If you have no idea what I'm talking about, turn in your nerd card right now. 

Deck holder

3D printing, like virtual reality, is one of those technology things that always seems to be on the cusp of going mainstream — without ever quite crossing over. Even though we’ve seen the concept play out for years on TV and in movies (what do you think a Star Trek replicator is doing?), having a 3D printer at home is still considered wildly exotic outside a small enthusiast audience.

Last year, I started playing around with 3D printing, less commonly known as additive manufacturing, mostly to satisfy my own curiosity, with an unexpected result. I’m now completely addicted to 3D printing. Over the past several months, I’ve searched for the best 3D printer technology and tested several 3D printing models, from rock-bottom Monoprice printers to step-up resin printers that produce a truly professional-level print for prototyping.

Below are printers in the lower-cost price range. We tested these 3D printers in the CNET Labs and compare the close-ups of one of our test prints, a bust of Abraham Lincoln. All 3D prints require a little smoothing and filing with a hobby file to look their best (you can also prime and paint each print, fill gaps with filler compound and so on) — but the Abes presented below are right off the print bed, no touch-ups after the printing.

One printer I have not tested yet, but hear a lot of good feedback about, is the Creality Ender 3, which currently costs an affordable $230 and has a large community of dedicated fans who claim it’s the best 3D printer. Just note that some more assembly is required than with these other printers.

For what to print and how to start printing, including materials (e.g., polylactic acid vs. ABS plastic), printing technology and software, see my latest tips and advice for 3D printing. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page.

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